Artist rendition of the bridge

Wildlife Considerations

Protecting wildlife and their habitat is a key part of conserving Kingston's biodiversity. As the Third Crossing progresses the project team is working hard to protect the rich variety of life and ecosystem near the future bridge. Experts will conduct surveys of plants and wildlife from the east-side and west-side areas and marine environment.

A number of wildlife reports have been completed as part of earlier phases of the project; however additional surveys are needed to satisfy environmental requirements prior to construction taking place:

  • Terrestrial Surveys
  • Botanical surveys: Investigations to locate butternut trees (Juglians cinerea) will be made.
  • Breeding bird surveys: Early morning breeding bird surveys will be conducted following standard protocols. The purpose of these surveys is to search for the presence of common and species at risk (SAR).
  • Bat surveys: Bat surveys will be conducted in the study area and will include a habitat assessment, stand-watch exit surveys and the use of acoustic bat detectors.
  • Wildlife habitat and visual encounter surveys: during all site investigations, area searches for wildlife will be conducted, including for those species groups not specifically targeted through the surveys. The visual encounter surveys will be conducted following recommended procedures.

The results of the site investigations will be summarized in a Species at Risk Summary Report.

2019 Work

 

Four bat houses have been installed on the east shore

Listen to fish and wildlife biologist Caleb Coughlin talk about bat houses installing in Kingston on CBC Ontario morning. LISTEN NOW

As part of our work with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, four bat houses were installed on April 30 on the east shore. The mix of standard and nursery bat houses were installed in the north side of the meadow on the Pittsburgh Library property. Another 18 bat houses are also planned to offset the removal of the 35 snag trees within the east approach. The location of these houses will be developed as part of the landscaping plans for the bridge and may also include other locations in Kingston. The bat houses are planned on a replacement ratio of 10 bat houses per hectare of impacted woodlands. Read more about the bat houses on our recent newsletter. Join our newsletter to get updates about the project.

Protective turtle fencing has been installed - June 12

Protecting wildlife and their habitat is a key part of conserving Kingston's biodiversity and the team is working hard to protect the ecosystem within the Project Area. Experts have and will continue to conduct surveys of plants and wildlife around the Project. To protect against adverse effects to Blanding's Turtles, Snapping Turtles,  Painted Turtles, Northern Map Turtles and other native turtles who may use or be in the Project Area, turtle exclusion fencing has been installed to prevent turtles from nesting. Throughout the Project, continuous visual surveys will be done by onsite personnel to ensure the fencing is effective, and turtles are protected from construction activities and equipment on the shorelines. If turtles are encountered within the construction area, trained environmental professionals will be onsite, to assess and rectify the situation minimizing harm to the local wildlife. All efforts are being made to ensure activities will be timed to occur outside of the sensitive overwintering and nest season. The team is committed to being good environmental stewards during the pre-construction and construction of the Project, including implementing a series of plans and procedures to ensure the proposed activities are reflective of the City's responsibility to protect and preserve lands and waters within the Project Area.

Read our latest e-newsletter about turtle fencing.

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